Indonesia Green Chronicle

Yansen – University of Bengkulu and James Cook University

Archive for the ‘Forestry’ Category

RI’s chances in climate-change tasks

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Review and Outlook, The Jakarta Post, December 22, 2011

The climate talks in Durban have just ended. The meeting not only hosted the 17th Conference of Parties (CoP-17) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change but also the 7th Session of the Conference of Parties serving as the Meeting of the Parties (CMP-7) to the Kyoto Protocol.

After two weeks of negotiations, the delegations came up with a resolution called the Durban Platform. The platform orders the establishment of an Ad Hoc Working Group on the Durban Platform for Enhanced Action. This working group will be mandated to develop a legal instrument, which will be applicable to all parties. The “new” protocol, or legally binding agreement, is expected to be ready by 2015 and to be effective by 2020.

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Written by yansenbengkulu

December 23, 2011 at 4:44 pm

The endless cycle of forest fires

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The Jakarta Post, September 22, 2011  The Brunei Times, September 23, 2011

Forest fires and haze have become an annual problem for Indonesia. During the dry season, forest fires always occur, especially in Sumatra and Kalimantan. Haze covers the sky; causes problems for the transportation sector; reduces economic activities; and stimulates health problems.

The problem has not only become a domestic affair but also affects Indonesia’s reputation in other countries. Singapore and Malaysia are two of the most adversely affected foreign countries due to the smog generated from the forest fires. This is called negative externalities by economists. We might still remember how the Malaysian government sent hundreds of fire squads, called “Bomba”, to help Indonesia to fight forest fires in 1997. The forest fire tragedy that year was one of the worst forest fires in Indonesian history, in which the smog even reached Thailand and the Philippines.

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Written by yansenbengkulu

September 23, 2011 at 12:07 am

Deforestation – always silent yet devastating

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The Jakarta Post, April 9, 2011  The Brunei Times, April 10, 2011

Amid news about a massive 9.0 Richter scale earthquake and a powerful tsunami that have hit Japan, there was little reporting about a flash flood that struck Pidie Regency in Aceh. Scores of people died, hundreds of homes were devastated and many residents were displaced (The Jakarta Post, March 14). Torrential rain around Halimon Mountain, a place where Hasan Tiro proclaimed the free Aceh movement in 1976, created an inland tsunami which washed away several villages in Tangse district.

When the governor of Aceh, Irwandi Yusuf, visited the location, he insisted that illegal logging was the main cause of the flooding. Illegal logging is truly a kind of forestry-related crime that has significant economic and ecological impacts. Thousands of hectares of forests have been damaged by this activity. As a result, environmental destruction has become worse and natural disasters such as flooding have become commonplace.

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Written by yansenbengkulu

April 9, 2011 at 3:38 pm

RI’s growing climate change challenges

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The Jakarta Post, Review and Outlook, December 20, 2010

Climate change has undeniably become one of the greatest global issues in decades. There is no such single issue that has brought so many countries to sit together to talk about the problem, even though from many different points of view and perspectives. Along the way, apprehensions about rising global temperatures, which initially were purely scientific, have now become more political (see Anthony Gidden, The Politics of Climate Change, 2009).

Early this December the climate change Conference of Parties (COP) 16 was undertaken in Cancun, Mexico. Although many are doubtful about the outcomes of the Cancun meeting, this COP is still an important milestone for dictating the future direction after the Protocol Kyoto ends in 2012.

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Written by yansenbengkulu

December 21, 2010 at 3:02 pm

Biodiversity, Indonesia and poverty

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The Jakarta Post, November 1, 2010

The 10th Conference of Parties (COP) of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) was held in Nagoya, Japan, from Oct. 18 to 29. Since the CBD was introduced in 1993, this convention is aimed at mainstreaming biodiversity conservation initiatives and sustainable use of biodiversity on a global scale. The CBD also intends to promote fair and equitable benefit-sharing of biological utilization, including genetic resources.

As a “mega-biodiversity” nation, Indonesia could become a key player in efforts to save global species. Indonesia could play a leading role in developing international policies that support conservation of tropical biological resources. Indonesia could also capitalize on expansion of international research collaborations to study biology and utilize natural products.

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Written by yansenbengkulu

November 1, 2010 at 4:25 pm

Urban forests, city crisis and our nation’s face

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The Jakarta Post, October 14, 2010

There are two opposite directions characterizing urban development in this country. In one direction, the main feature of city development is the increase in number of buildings and shopping centers symbolizing economic improvement. Meanwhile, we are losing interest in creating more green areas. City parks and urban forests are not perceived as essentials. What are forest areas for in the middle of the city? That may be a question for many.

As the expansion of new malls, skyscrapers and other business-oriented constructions promise many more financial benefits, the authority, such as city councils, are easily issuing building permits. New shopping centers in fact create more traffic congestion, as well as conflicts with traditional markets. Those thriving new constructions have also increased the pressure on the land carrying capacity.

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Written by yansenbengkulu

October 14, 2010 at 10:15 pm

Forestry issues in RI-Malaysia border talks

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The Jakarta Post, September 27, 2010  The Brunei Times, September 28, 2010

Indonesia and Malaysia recently held a bilateral meeting in Kinabalu with no significant results.  However, at least there is a clear message from the meeting — that these two neighboring countries have a great deal of work to do. Like a pebble in a shoe, border disputes will continue to be a main obstacle in maintaining a good relationship between the two nations.

The relationship between Indonesia and Malaysia is like a roller coaster, up and down and full of surprises. The shared cultural roots between both nations often become a problem rather than a blessing. The recent dispute in regard to the arrest of Malaysian fishermen by the Indonesian authorities and the detention of officials from the Indonesian Maritime Affairs and Fisheries Ministry by Malaysian Police has just added fuel to the fire. This latest conflict adds to a series of disputes between the two nations, after the Sipadan and Ligitan case, the Ambalat Bloc clash and conflicts on cultural claims.

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Written by yansenbengkulu

September 27, 2010 at 3:54 pm